Pre-conference Sessions

Special Pre-conference (10:30am-12:00pm)
New Theories of Community with Dr. Harold McDougall
Take advantage of this free, but space-limited opportunity to interact with one of the two major keynote speakers—Dr. Harold McDougall sharing theory, research tools, as well as context from what he learned in his study Black Baltimore: A New Theory of Community to inform researchers studying community organizing, base communities, and community led change. Participants will be sent several chapters from this book and several newer articles and chapters from his more recent work to discuss in a small seminar like setting. Participants who participate in this preconference might (but do not have to) complement this morning session by participating in the Baltimore Untour described in the 1-4pm sessions.
Facilitator: Harold McDougall, Howard University

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Full Day Pre-conference (9:00 -12:00pm and 1:00 - 4:00pm)
Research driving better design, practice, evaluation, and assessment in global and immersive service-learning
The focus of this session is two-fold: 1) to share key insights from the most current research on global service-learning (GSL) and service-learning immersion programs (i.e., alternative breaks) and, 2) to assist participants in developing a GSL research proposal and action plan. The session will also present diverse approaches to research design, highlight useful instruments and models (i.e., intercultural competence models) and describe how research informs and improves design, practice and assessment in GSL. The session will proceed in blocks that describe research on student learning outcomes, program factors, community impacts, and institutional structures. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1) identify and describe previous GSL research and key studies including major findings, useful instruments and theories; 2) examine areas for further research; 3) explore and discuss connections between their research interests and gaps in current GSL research; and 4) design and present a GSL research proposal and plan with the session facilitators and participants.
Facilitators:
Richard Kiely, Cornell University
Eric Hartman, Providence College
Elizabeth K. Niehaus, University of Maryland
Nora P. Reynolds, Temple University
Jessica Arends, Penn State University


To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:

The session facilitators have summarized many of the key resources in global service-learning research here and shared their PowerPoint here:
Please, of course, cite appropriately.




Full Day Pre-conference (9:00 - 12:00pm and 1:00 - 4:00pm)
Symposium: Connecting Community Knowing Through Focus Group Research
This session will convene a group of researchers from around the country to review the basic principles of focus group methodology. The participants will spend approximately one and one-half hours at the beginning of the session discussing the process of conducting focus group research, partially conducting a mock interview for the participants. After the initial training, the participating teams will travel to community organizations to conduct a one hour focus group to address three major areas: 1) what is the nature of the involvement of university/secondary school students with the organization, 2) what are the three major impacts that occur as a result of these programs, and 3) what additional action/services would you like universities/secondary schools to provide in order to improve the operation of your programs? The research teams will return to the conference to debrief and to begin to assess/analyze the notes taken at the meetings. Group analysis will reveal some preliminary findings about general activities and trends. Further analysis will be conducted by the organizing team and plans for reporting the results will be developed. It is expected that the results will be reported to the conference committee by February 2013.
Facilitators:
Robert, Shumer, University of Minnesota
Jeffrey Howard, Depaul University
Robin Crews, Loyola University of Maryland
Megan Linz Dickerson, Loyola University of Maryland

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Morning Pre-conference (9:00am - 12:00pm)
Exploring Secondary Data Sources for Research on Community Engagement in K-12 and Higher Education
This session will engage participants in exploring how data sets from various existing databases can be used for secondary analyses to research important issues on service-learning and community engagement. The nature of the contents contained in a diverse set of quantitative and qualitative large-scale datasets such as the Learn and Serve data system (LASSIE), Student Experiences at Research Universities (SERU), and the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification Data (CCEC) will be reviewed and discussed. Participants will receive information on how to access the various data and will explore each dataset’s opportunities and limitations. During the session, participants will work in small groups to familiarize themselves more fully with one or more datasets with an eye toward developing a set of research questions that can guide their investigations on community engagement, using the data contained in the datasets. The session will provide opportunities for participants to network and share interests with other researchers.
Facilitators:
Cathy Burack, Brandeis University
Andrew Furco, University of Minnesota
Alan Melchior, Brandeis University
John Saltmarsh, University of Massachusetts Boston

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Morning Pre-conference (9:00am - 12:00pm)
Measuring and Improving Campus and Community Civic Health
The purpose of this workshop is to discuss the roles higher education institutions play in advancing the civic health of their campus and broader community (e.g., how do service-learning and community engagement enhance civic health). Participants will learn about the new Campus Civic Health Initiative, a three year partnership between AASCU’s American Democracy Project and the National Conference on Citizenship, designed to support institutions to assess, understand and promote campus and community civic health. Participants will leave the workshop with an understanding of common indicators of civic health (e.g., political engagement, public work, volunteering and giving, group participation, online engagement, social trust, civic knowledge and agency, social connectedness) and how they are measured. Participants will be asked to consider how they would define and measure civic health in their own campus, organization, and/or community and to consider where there are conceptual, practical, or process-oriented gaps in our work to-date. Participants will leave the session with a campus and community civic health assessment tool and an understanding of how they can use it to conduct their own research, evaluation and action planning.
Facilitators:
Kristi Tate, National Conference on Citizenship
Jennifer Domagal-Goldman, American Association of State Colleges and Universities

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Morning Pre-conference (9:00am - 12:00pm)
Getting Your Community-Engaged Scholarship Published
This workshop will build faculty capacity to connect their community-engaged practice to community-engaged scholarship. New and seasoned faculty seeking to build their capacity to derive publishable scholarship from their various community involvements (teaching, research, service) will find this workshop of interest. We will familiarize faculty with relevant sets of scholarship assessment criteria relevant for community-engaged scholarship (Glassick, National Review Board); share strategies for translating community-engaged activity into scholarly articles; describe the mechanics of the publication process from writing to submission, review, and acceptance/rejection; and discuss what reviewers and editors look for in a submitted article by practicing to be a reviewer. As a result of participation in this workshop, participants will better understand the various manifestations of community-engaged scholarship and increase their chances for getting their community-engaged scholarship published. In addition, other journal editors publishing community-engaged scholarship and attending the 2012 IARSLCE Conference will join us at the end of the workshop for attendees to learn more about the various journals.
Facilitators:
Jeffrey Howard, Editor, Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning
Barbara Holland, Editor, Metropolitan Universities Journal

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Morning Pre-conference (9:00am - 12:00pm)
Grant Writing and Fundraising
Targeted to community partner fellows who are interested in learning new ways to write grants and fundraise for their community engaged projects, but also open to other participants this session will be offered by seasoned grant-writers and fundraisers with expertise both nationally with federal grants and more regionally with local foundations. Participants will leave this workshop with tips and increased grant-writing skills, as well as knowledge for how to seek out future often untapped sources of funding.

Facilitator Erika Seth Davies has been a nonprofit development professional for over ten years with a focus on foundation and corporate relations. Ms. Davies has spent the majority of her career working for both local and national nonprofit organizations as an employee and consultant, including the Association of Black Foundation Executives (ABFE), The SEED Foundation, the DC Children & Youth Investment Trust Corporation, the Tavis Smiley Foundation, McDaniel College, and the Baltimore Educational Scholarship Trust.

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Afternoon Pre-conference (1:00pm - 4:00pm)
Place-Based Learning in Baltimore: Experiencing Local History to Deepen and Enliven Community-Based Learning
This session will include a guided outing investigating the theory and practice of Place-Based Learning. Baltimore will be our “text” for this session, as we explore its layered people’s history and complex urban issues and dynamics. A three hour “untour” will explore current issues and trends such as housing, economics, transportation, food, and culture, as well revealing "people's history" sites. Participants will explore important, but largely unremembered, historical sites that reveal Baltimore’s deep context as a site of peace and justice activity. Did you know that Baltimore has been home to numerous civil rights and peace movement actions? What early civil rights actions happened at Read’s Drugstore’s lunch counter and Druid Hill Park’s tennis courts? Who were the Baltimore Four and Catonsville Nine and how did they end the selective service draft? Did you know that Frederick Douglass learned to read and write as a slave boy on Baltimore’s wharf, and that he later escaped from here to begin telling his story and leading the charge to end slavery? We will also visit diverse neighborhoods and parks to consider the complex social and environmental dynamics at work in these spaces. We hope you will learn, for example, how the housing practice of “blockbusting” provoked divisions of race and class that continue to impact the city’s diverse communities today. Participants will be encouraged to brainstorm opportunities for place-based learning within their own local contexts. How are the environments of your own community-based programming charged with sites and stories of human interaction and meaning? Along the way we hope you’ll gain a new set of eye’s for seeing the world around you, because in the words of anthropologist Clifford Geertz, “No one lives in the world in general. Everybody…lives in some confined and limited stretch of it—‘the world around here.’” Open your eyes, ears, and minds, and let’s go explore the City together!
Facilitator:
Joby Taylor, The Shriver Center, University of Maryland Baltimore County

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Afternoon Pre-conference (1:00pm - 4:00pm)
Understanding the Contributions of Qualitative Approaches to Service-learning Research and Assessment
This session will develop participants understanding of the potential contributions of qualitative research to service-learning. More specifically, we will focus on the relationship between what we know about service-learning outcomes and how we know. Using examples from our own research, we will provide an overview of several qualitative methodological approaches to service-learning research and their potential contributions, briefly present results of these studies that complicate several taken-for-granted areas of service-learning research such as appreciation of diversity, border-crossing, transformative learning, and requiring service, and then engage participants in discussion about what they consider to be the more vexing questions associated with service-learning initiatives that qualitative approaches might address. Our plan is to generate a list of researchable questions and approaches to studying them.
Facilitators:
Susan R. Jones, The Ohio State University
Jennifer Gilbride-Brown, The Ohio State University

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Afternoon Pre-conference (1:00pm - 4:00pm)
Connecting Graduate Students to Concepts and Resources to do Community-Engaged Research
This session will build on and connect the current knowing of graduate students with knowledge, resources, and support to successfully complete community-engaged research. As much time as possible will devoted to presenting case studies (actual dissertations redeveloped as a case studies) highlighting various research designs. The learning outcomes include
  • understanding the definitional, conceptual, and practice dimensions of the scholarship of engagement movement in higher education,
  • applying these ideas to the disciplinary work of participants,
  • exploring relevant theories and research designs that support community-engaged research,
  • identifying the competencies needed by scholars to undertake community-engaged scholarship, including how to engage with community partners,
  • developing a draft plan for a potential community-engaged research project and discussing strategies for implementing this plan in a doctoral program, and
  • connecting with other graduate student scholars and faculty scholars who can support their engagement efforts.
Facilitators:
Audrey J. Jaeger, North Carolina State University
Lorilee R. Sandmann, University of Georgia
Jennifer Purcell, EdD student, University of Georgia

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Afternoon Pre-conference (1:00pm - 4:00pm)
Innovative Practices in Peer Review: Expanding the Boundaries for Community-Engaged Scholarship
The purpose of this session is to launch a research and action agenda to expand the concept of peer review – the process by which communities assess the quality of scholarly products and, at times, facilitate or restrict the dissemination of such products. This session is intended to involve faculty, administrators, graduate students, community partners, journal editors, disciplinary leaders, and funders. Using a modified charrette format, participants will work collaboratively to design a research and action agenda around peer review. The focus will be on designing a strategy for documenting perceptions of peer review within various sectors (faculty, administration, students, community partners, journal editors, disciplines), as well as identifying innovative practices that are already underway. Learning outcomes for participants include:
  • articulating principles of peer review;
  • identifying innovative mechanisms for peer review and practices that recognize such strategies;
  • defining a research and action agenda and/or specific research projects to study the expansion of the notion of peer review; and
  • establishing a network of individuals interested in working further on this topic.
Facilitators:
Sherril B. Gelmon, Portland State University & Community-Campus Partnerships for Health
Cathy Jordan, University of Minnesota & CES4Health.info
Susan Ann Gust, Community Activist/Small Business Owner & Community-Campus Partnerships for Health
Cathy Burack, Brandeis University
Sarena D. Seifer, Community-Campus Partnerships for Health & the University of Guelph

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Afternoon Pre-conference (1:00pm - 4:00pm)
Measuring Civic Learning: Meaningful Strategies for Educating 21st Century Citizens
This workshop is intended engage researchers interested in furthering the field of knowledge around civic learning and democratic engagement, as well as campus practitioners interested in learning new ways to develop meaningful assessment of civic as part of an institutional assessment agenda. Using the new report A Crucible Moment: College Learning and Democracy’s Future, participants will discuss current areas of research related to civic learning, and identify areas for additional research. Small and large group discussion of best practices for the assessment of civic learning will focus on both indirect and direct measures of civic learning and campus engagement, including the application of nationally developed rubrics from Association of American Colleges and Universities VALUE project, the Personal and Social Responsibility Inventory (PSRI) and the Global Perspectives Inventory (GPI).
Facilitators:
Eleanor Hall, Association of American Colleges and Universities
Robert D. Reason, Iowa State University

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:





Afternoon Pre-conference (1:00pm - 4:00pm)
“Can I Major in Service Learning?”: Delving into The Theory and Practice of Institutionalizing Academic Programs in Community Engagement in Higher Education
This preconference session offers an opportunity to deeply explore the theory and practice of building an academic program – a certificate, minor, or major – focused on community engagement, broadly construed. It will provide participants both the conceptual underpinning for such academic programs, and numerous practical resources for developing, implementing, and expanding their own programs on their own campuses. The session draws on the numerous resources of the Center for Engaged Democracy, including a large number of syllabi, program charts, research material, and working papers on issues of research, best practice, and program development. Participants will have the opportunity to gather key research and resources, as well as discuss issues around academic programs, specifically: conceptual foundations of such programs; key courses in such programs; key organizational structures in such programs; assessment of program outcomes; assessment of student outcomes; network building; community building; and core competencies in such programs. Participants will learn about both short-term and long-term outcomes from these programs and both successes and challenges in studying them from a research perspective.
Facilitator:
Dan W. Butin, Merrimack College

To access materials from this session please click on the file link(s) below:




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